How to water the plants inside the greenhouse

We all know that plants need to be watered – how much and how often can vary depending on the plant, time of year, temperature, soil, light, and more. Plants inside a greenhouse often have a limited amount of soil compared to plants outside. This means that the plants often require more water than similar plants outside – a little dependent on the temperature, soil, and more. Popular greenhouse plants like tomatoes and cucumbers need 2-4 litres a day when they are fully grown, producing tomatoes and more.  

Ways to water the plants

A popular solution for growing plants in a greenhouse is a planter box with a self-watering capillary box inside. It is self-watering and can contain a large amount of water that the plants can draw from – often, plants in a capillary box use 8-10 litres a day. You can also have pots and other containers standing in a tray with water so the soil can soak up the water continuously. There will be a little more soil with an ordinary raised garden bed, but you will still have to water regularly using water can or similar.

Install an irrigation system and save time and effort

By installing an irrigation system in your greenhouse, you can make sure that the plants are watered regularly. Use a timer to ensure that the plants are getting enough water and not too much, either. The soil must be wet all the time, so the plants never miss ‘food’, but the roots do not like to soak and can be damaged if the soil is too wet all the time. We recommend that you water the plants at night as the plants will be able to make the most of the water at this time. You can water early in the morning, alternatively. In hot periods, you may have to do both unless you have automated the process. Find the right watering level as the plants should have moisture constantly and must not dry out. Again, check with your plant market or the net as some plants may have other requirements.

Watering can keep track of the amount of water

Using a good old water can is a little more work, but you are in good contact with the plants and the soil and can keep an eye on things around the greenhouse. If you have two cans, you can balance better and avoid harming the back in the process. When you water this way, it is easy to add a little fertiliser to the water when the plants need vitamins. Remember to water the soil and not the plants. 

Backpack watering tank for particular tasks

We also have a backpack watering tank in our selection so you can have both hands free while watering and providing the plants with fertiliser. The watering tank can also be used for distributing insecticide if needed. Remember that you will have to eat the vegetables and more at some point, so try and use organic and natural insecticides when possible!   

Use rainwater if possible

Do you have a greenhouse with rain gutters? Then you can apply a container to collect the rainwater every time it rains. 1 mm of rain is the equivalent of 1 litre per m2. A classic 10 m2 greenhouse in glass or polycarbonate has a roof surface of app. 14 m2. That is 14 litres of rainwater every time 1 mm rain comes. Make sure that you have a large container for the water. You can also collect rainwater from your house by applying a device to the downpipes. If the roof contains asbestos or has new roofing felt (less than one year old), you should not water your plants with rainwater from the roof. Apart from the environmental advantages of using rainwater for your plants – and the fact that it will save you money – your plants will not have lime stains on the leaves when you use rainwater. Ensure that the container you use for storing the rainwater has a tap for the water as an open container soon will gather too much dirt and debris like leaves and more. There will also be a risk for animals to fall in!           

 

 

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